Clinical Communications

Helping patients manage their pain is important to every healthcare facility. Being able to monitor and record each patient’s pain level on an ongoing basis can be challenging, as it takes a large amount of a nurse’s time.

Our customers know their success is important to us and we are available for support, training, and guidance at any time - including during this pandemic.

In this post, we look into the past, present, and future of healthcare communication technology. Technology has evolved significantly over time, especially when it comes to the ways in which we communicate.

Hospital call center operators are often the face of the healthcare organization. A single operator may talk to hundreds of patients and medical staff each day.

Communication software and systems within a hospital are notoriously disconnected because they come from different vendors, operate on a variety of platforms, and are often specialized for each department. However, it’s necessary for data or partial data, from one system to be communicated to another system.

Patients often have a whole team of medical professionals treating them. The Institute of Medicine found that each year the average elderly patient sees 7 physicians (5 specialists and 2 primary care physicians) across 4 different practices.

Amtelco has been awarded a Top Workplaces 2020 honor and a special award for work/life flexibility by The Wisconsin State Journal. These awards are based solely on employee feedback gathered through a third-party survey administered by employee engagement technology partner Energage, LLC.

Many of us are familiar with the term “the internet of things” (IoT), but only some know that the road to IoT began back in 1982, when grad students from the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University connected a modified Coke vending machine to the internet.

In the 1930s, about 40 percent of doctor-patient visits in the United States occurred in patient homes. Better known as “house calls” this kind of healthcare accounted for only 0.6 percent of healthcare visits by 1980.